Control electronics with your eyes with this Raspberry Hypervisor

The wearable device tracks the user's eye movements and pupil position to move a mouse cursor around on a device. 

People who cannot use their hands with full efficiency may find it extremely difficult to interact with touchscreen devices. So as to determine where you are looking, one of the IR CSI cameras feeds a continuous video stream to the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+ running OpenCV (which is a library focused on real-time-computer-vision).

 

Meanwhile, a second camera is used to improve the accuracy of certain things like where you are looking and where your eye pupil is pointing at.

After all the calculations are complete, the device determines where you are looking at and places the cursor there. You can blink to click, squint to drag and drop, blink twice in rapid succession to scroll up and down. Devices are connected to a dedicated receiver that draws in data from the headset, so it knows where to position the cursor.

So as to determine where you are looking, one of the IR CSI cameras feeds a continuous video stream to the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+ running OpenCV (which is a library focused on real-time-computer-vision). Meanwhile, a second camera is used to improve the accuracy of certain things like where you are looking and where your eye pupil is pointing at.

After all the calculations are complete, the device determines where you are looking at and places the cursor there. You can blink to click, squint to drag and drop, blink twice in rapid succession to scroll up and down. Devices are connected to a dedicated receiver that draws in data from the headset, so it knows where to position the cursor.

The Hypervisor is an eye tracking headband powered by a Raspberry Pi, capable of controlling an entire room of computers, phones, and tablets just by looking at them.

The Hypervisor uses an infrared camera pointed at your eye, a full-color camera on your forehead, and an IR transceiver, to identify exactly where you're looking, and which device you're using.

This is an entry to the Hackaday Prize 2020, built to fill United Cerebral Palsy's needs. By replacing keyboards, mice, and touchscreens with head turns, looking, and blinking, the Hypervisor can become the universal input device for those with diminished motor control.

The project's electronics and physical components are in a pretty good state. The next tasks are the software, the OpenCV gaze-calculation system, and the monitor-mounted counterpart. The Hypervisor is MIT licensed open hardware. It may have dependencies with more restrictive licenses. Source: www.hackaday.io/